2016 Conference: Andrew Campbell

WASTE NOT, WANT NOT:

The Circular Economy to Food Security

29-30 August 2016, Canberra

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Mr Andrew Campbell
CEO, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research

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Mr Andrew Campbell is the new CEO of Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR). He commenced his five year term on 31 July 2016. Andrew Campbell was formerly the Director of the Research School for the Environment and Livelihoods at Charles Darwin University in Darwin and before that previously Managing Director of Triple Helix Consulting and he has played influential roles in natural resource management in Australia for 25 years. He has considerable research leadership experience, notably as Executive Director of Land and Water Australia from 2000-2006. He has also had senior policy roles in land, water and biodiversity management as a senior executive in the Australian Government environment portfolio.

Andrew was instrumental in the development of Landcare, working with the National Farmers’ Federation and the Australian Conservation Foundation to develop the proposal that catalysed the Decade of Landcare. He is Chair of the Board of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network, a Visiting Fellow at the Fenner School Environment and Society at the Australian National University (ANU), a Commissioner with the IUCNā€™s World Commission on Protected Areas, a member of the Science Advisory Panel of Landcare Research New Zealand, and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. He trained in forestry at Creswick and the University of Melbourne and rural sociology at Wageningen University in The Netherlands. Andrew maintains an involvement in his family farm in western Victoria, where his family have been farming since the 1860s.